1984 Ferrari 126 C4

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Introduction

The 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 is a Formula One car that was designed by Mauro Forghieri and built by Scuderia Ferrari for the 1984 Formula One season. It was driven by Michele Alboreto and René Arnoux. The 126 C4 is best remembered for its dominant performance in the 1984 season, in which it won all but one race, and for its innovative design.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Design and Development

Chassis and Suspension

The 126 C4 was the first Ferrari to feature a carbon fiber composite monocoque chassis, which was designed to be stiffer and lighter than the traditional aluminum monocoque chassis used in previous Ferraris. The suspension consisted of unequal length upper and lower wishbones, with pushrod operated inboard rocker arms and coil springs over dampers.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Engine

The engine used in the 126 C4 was a 1.5L turbocharged V6, developed from the 037 engine used in Ferrari’s previous cars. It was capable of producing up to 800 hp, and featured electronic fuel injection and a double overhead camshaft.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Transmission

The 126 C4 was fitted with a 5-speed manual transmission, which was designed to be more reliable than the semi-automatic transmission used in previous Ferraris. It featured a carbon fiber composite driveshaft and a limited slip differential.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Aerodynamics

The 126 C4 featured a number of aerodynamic features, including a low-drag body shape, an adjustable rear wing and an adjustable front spoiler. These features allowed the car to generate downforce at high speeds, while still maintaining a low drag coefficient.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Brakes

The 126 C4 featured ventilated disc brakes on all four wheels, which provided superior stopping power and improved brake cooling.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Wheels and Tyres

The 126 C4 was fitted with 15-inch wheels and Michelin tyres.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Electronics

The 126 C4 was the first Ferrari to feature an electronic engine management system, which allowed the driver to adjust the engine’s power output. It also featured a sophisticated electronic traction control system, which allowed the car to maintain traction in slippery conditions.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Results

The 126 C4 proved to be a dominant force in the 1984 season. It won 8 out of the 16 races that season, with Michele Alboreto taking 6 wins and René Arnoux taking 2. It also secured a total of 9 pole positions and 10 fastest laps, making it the most successful Ferrari in Formula One history.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Legacy

The 126 C4 is remembered as one of the most successful Ferraris in Formula One history, and its design features have gone on to be used in many other Ferraris. Its engine design also served as the basis for the 053 engine used in Ferrari’s 1985 car, the 156/85.

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Gallery of 1984 Ferrari 126 C4

Front View

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

The front view of the 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 shows its low-drag body shape and adjustable front spoiler.

Rear View

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

The rear view of the 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 shows its adjustable rear wing and the large exhaust pipes.

Engine

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

The engine of the 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 is a 1.5L turbocharged V6, capable of producing up to 800 hp.

Interior

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

The interior of the 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 features a carbon fiber composite monocoque chassis and a 5-speed manual transmission.

Wheels and Tyres

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

The 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 is fitted with 15-inch wheels and Michelin tyres.

Electronics

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

The 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 is the first Ferrari to feature an electronic engine management system and an electronic traction control system.

Racing

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

The 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 is best remembered for its dominant performance in the 1984 Formula One season, in which it won 8 out of 16 races.

Driver

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

The 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 was driven by Michele Alboreto and René Arnoux.

Mauro Forghieri

1984 Ferrari 126 C4

The 1984 Ferrari 126 C4 was designed by Mauro Forghieri, who was the chief engineer of Scuderia Ferrari at the time.